Book Review: Fortunately, the Milk by Neil Gaiman and Skottie Young

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Summary

This is a middle grade graphic novel. The father of two children goes out to get milk so they can have their cereal and tea for breakfast, but he takes a really long time to get back. So, over breakfast, he tells them the tale of what happened that made him take so long.

What I Liked

  • This was sort of a fun story. It involves many different settings (like pirate ship, alien spaceship, etc.) and time periods. It’s exactly the sort of story you would want to make up if you’re camping under the stars or trying to distract your child from a storm. It was intriguing and unpredictable, especially since it involved time travel.
  • I just love that graphic novels are now a thing for all ages. I think they’re important to reach those who otherwise might not read at all. (I know this isn’t specific to this book, but I wanted to mention it anyway.)

What I Didn’t Like

  • At one point the father comes across ancient gods and interacts with them in some capacity. Depending on your religion or your child’s knowledge of such things, this might not be a good book for them. (Like, if they’re already reading Percy Jackson, they’ll probably be fine. But if you’re reading it to a younger crew who doesn’t quite get the concept yet, maybe not.)
  • How safe is that milk?? I read this book right after I read Fast Food Nation, so my food-safety brain was very concerned about the germs this adventurous milk must have acquired! 😛

In Conclusion

If you have a reluctant middle grade reader, you’re an adult who loves a whimsical story, or you have curious children who love hearing stories, this might be the book for you.

Find it on: Goodreads | Amazon (affiliate link)

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1 year ago: Book Review: Undeniably Chosen by Shelly Crane

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Book Review: The False Prince by Jennifer Nielsen

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Summary

Sage is one of a few orphans chosen by Conner Bevin to pretend to be the long-lost prince. Conner, a nobleman, claims that this is the best for everybody – for the kingdom, for him, and the orphan he chooses. We as the reader get to follow Sage as he competes to be the best false prince for Bevins plan, and as he uncovers the details of the plan.

What I Liked

  • There were a lot of subtle complexities to this book. It wasn’t a mystery, but we were constantly learning new things about all of the characters, the kingdom, and the plan to be a false prince. It kept me intrigued the whole way.
  • I’m struggling to find a way to describe this book without giving much away. Lets just say that it definitely cracks my top five books for this year.

What I Didn’t Like

  • This was clearly written for an upper middle grade or lower young adult audience (similar to the Percy Jackson series I would say). This was fine by me, but I want to let you know in case that isn’t your cup of tea.
  • There was a specific chapter that confused me so much that I had to read it twice. But once I got it…. wow!

In Conclusion

If you’re looking for a great fantasy, this is your book!

Find it on: Goodreads | Amazon (affiliate link)

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Ten Books I Want My Future Children to Read

This is another installment of The Broke and Bookish’s Top Ten Tuesday. Today we are sharing ten books we want our children (or future children) to read.

Most of the books below are listed because I enjoyed them so much as a child that I want my children to have the same experience.

(Clicking on the pictures will take you to Amazon through an affiliate link.)

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster

I loved this book when I first read it in fifth grade. I loved how the author played with words like “jumping to conclusions” and “on the tip of your tongue”. It was just such a magical world.

Little Critter by Mercer Mayer

Both of my parents would read these stories to me as a child. I think my favorite was Little Critter’s These Are My Pets. I even had the treasury to read from as I got older. Little Critter has such a wide variety of experiences, it’s fantastic.

Time Stops for No Mouse by Michael Hoeye

This book is such a great mystery adventure. I think it’s really undersold – I’ve never seen anyone recommend it. Which is a shame, because it’s a great book!

Running Out of Time by Margaret Peterson Haddix

This is another book that I loooved as a child. It’s about a girl who thinks she is living in the 1840s, but soon finds out that she lives in modern day. Because the people who run the 1840s society won’t hand out medicine, she must embark on a journey to save them from diphtheria.

Holes by Louis Sachar

This was the first children’s book I remember reading that had a lot of moving pieces that pulled together perfectly in the end. This fascinated me.

The BFG by Roald Dahl

Most of Roald Dahl’s stories are magical. This is no exception.


School Story by Andrew Clements

Another great story.


Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling

I would be remiss if I didn’t include this on my list! I read the first book in the series when I was in third grade and Harry Potter grew up as I grew up.

Amelia Bedelia by Peggy Parish

This is a great picture book series about someone named Amelia Bedelia who takes everything literally. For example, when playing baseball, if someone yells “Go home!”, she’ll run to her house instead of home base.

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by Bill Martin Jr., John Archambault, and Lois Ehlert

Skit skat skoodle-doot, flip flop flee! I’ll race you to the top of the coconut tree!

What books would you add to this list?

❤ Annette

10 Books I Want My Future Children to Read

Book Review: Taking the Cake by Lisa Papademetriou

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐
Book 2 in the Confectionately Yours series

This book follows Haley, a middle schooler, as she deals with friends, ex-friends, crushes, and her family. This book follows her throughout the fall, as she deals with Halloween and Thanksgiving.

I know I’m technically to old to be reading a book at this level, but I really enjoy reading about Haley and her adventures! This was another sweet installment in the series. Just like the first book, there are a couple of recipes (including gluten free ones) included.

Find it on: Goodreads | Amazon (affiliate link)

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Great Books for Teaching Math

I have another list today whose topic comes from the Broke and Bookish’s Top Ten Tuesday. (I’ll be linking up there too.) This week’s post is supposed to be about anything related for back-to-school. So I have for you ten books for teaching math. These are books that I remember from my own school days, ones I learned about as an education major (and math minor), or just ones I’ve discovered on my own. I’ve tried to list them in order from youngest target audience to oldest target audience, but a lot of them are flexible and can be used for many grades.

Clicking on an image will take you to Amazon via an affiliate link.

My Very First Number Book by Wilkes

This book is for those who are just discovering the world of numbers. It introduces the concept in an awesome, colorful way.


Dinner at the Panda Palace by Stephanie Calmenson (illustrated by Nadine Wescott)

This is a cute counting book. It follows Mr. Panda as he works to seat different sized groups of animals, from ten down to one small mouse.

The Doorbell Rang by Pat Hutchins

This book follows a family as they try to divide up their cookies for the guests that just keep coming!


One Grain of Rice by Demi

Even though this is a picture book, the story still fascinates me today. The main character gets one grain of rice on the first day. The next day she gets two, then after that four, and so on, doubling each day. It’s fun to see how quickly the amount of rice gets out of hand!

The M&M’s Brand Counting Book

I remember working on learning how to make bar graphs with this book. It was fun and, since it happened 15 or so years ago, memorable. The only trouble might be getting children to wait to eat their M&Ms.

Math Curse by Jon Scieszka

I learned about this one in one of my elementary education classes. It’s an awesome book about a girl who hates math and wants to be rid of it forever – only to discover that it’s everywhere!

Sir Cumference and the First Round Table by Cindy Neuschwander and Wayne Geehan

This is another book that I learned about in college. Sir Cumference actually has a bunch of pun-worthy math related books that make great introductory stories to different mathematical concepts. (Like circumference, for example. 🙂)


Sideways Arithmetic from Wayside School by Louis Sachar

This is a companion math book that uses the characters and settings established in Sachar’s Sidways Stories from Wayside School series. Although the target audience for his chapter books is probably late elementary school (grades 3-6 or so), a lot of the math in this book is a little more challenging and may even be fun to pick up in junior high and high school.

Spurious Correlations by Tyler Vigen

I was gifted this book as an adult. It’s full of graphs that correlate two unrelated things, like beef consumption and number of people struck by lightning. It’s a great way to show that correlation does not always equal causation. Be sure to read the book before you hand it off to any students though. I don’t remember if all topics were appropriate.


Flatland by Edwin Abbot

To be fair I haven’t yet read this entire book, but it was referred to a lot by my Calculus 3 teacher. What I have read was quite interesting – it goes over all the intricacies that go into a the two-dimensional society of Flatland.

So those are all of my math related books for you! Which ones would you add to this list?

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