The Ultimate Fall Bookish Bucket List

It’s still hitting 100° F almost every day here (ick), but I’m trying to get into the fall (autumn) spirit! Here’s a list of bookish things to do before fall is over!

  1. Make (crochet, knit, etc.) a Harry Potter house scarf
  2. Curl up with a pumpkin spice latte (or any fall drink) and a good book
  3. Read a fall-themed book
  4. Dress up as a book character for Halloween
  5. Have book club around a bonfire
  6. Take a walk while listening to an audiobook
  7. Read a spooky novel/thriller
  8. Light a candle to read next to
  9. Build a blanket fort to read inside of!
  10. Make a fleece blanket for cozy reading
  11. Read a novel with a supernatural character
  12. Make butterbeer
  13. Make an autumn recipe from your favorite book
  14. Find a new bookstore
  15. Read a book about football
  16. Carve a pumpkin with a bookish theme/character
  17. Make autumn decorations out of books pages
  18. Find a new coffee shop
  19. Buy a used book
  20. Learn archery (because so many book characters know how, why shouldn’t you?)
  21. Donate books you don’t need/want anymore
  22. Do a fall photo shoot for Bookstagram
  23. Attend a library hosted program
  24. Have a picnic! When you’re full, lay down and relax with a good book
  25. Find out of there is a free little library near you
  26. Make a list of books you are thankful for
  27. Go antiquing and find a vintage book
  28. Create a 3D pumpkin out of book pages
  29. Create a kindle cover out of an old sweater
  30. Read about a fall holiday (such as Dia de los Muertos, Oktoberfest, etc.)

Which one are you most excited to do? What should I add to this list?

❤ Annette

fall list

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10 Picture Books I Want to Read

I know that I’m technically way too old to read picture books, but what’s the point of knowing how to read if you can’t read whatever you want? Plus, I find that children’s books can be incredibly creative and the artwork is beautiful.

Clicking on an image will take to you Amazon via an affiliate link.

How to Code a Sandcastle by Josh Funk

Found this one thanks to Poisoned Pen’s monthly newsletter. It sounds interesting but also very fun.


Never Take a Shark to the Dentist by Judi Barrett

This looks fun and quirky.


Please Bring Balloons by Lindsay Ward

I really like balloons? Usually hot air balloons, but I’m not going to be picky. 🙂 (You can also check out Hot Air Balloon Books on My TBR List.)


Violet the Pilot by Steve Breen

I’m mostly intrigued by this one because the title rhymes. 😛


Tea Rex by Molly Idle

Dinosaurs and tea. Sold.

The Story of Fish and Snail by Deborah Freedman

A book about a story! (Which sounds weird… Goodreads describes it better.)

Firebird by Misty Copeland

I loved her young reader’s edition chapter book, so I’m excited to read her picture book as well.


Detective Dog by Julia Donaldson

Now that I have a dog, I’m more of a dog person. Which means I need to catch up on my dog-ish reading. 🙂


There Might Be Lobsters by Carolyn Crimi

Another doggie book!


Found Dogs by Erica Sirotich

This looks amazingly adorable! Just look at the cover!

 

What other picture books should I add to my list?

pic books TBR

1 year ago: My Favorite Childhood Picture Books

Can’t-Wait Wednesday

CAN'T

I got this idea from Wishful Endings who hosts a weekly link-up for books for which people are waiting. So here is a book that I can’t wait for!

Wildcard by Marie Lu

While I don’t think I loved Warcross as much as others did, I still enjoyed it enough that I have to find out what happens next! Wildcard is the next book in the series, and it’s expected to come out on September 18. I’m not reading much about the sequel so I don’t go in with weird expectations.

(affiliate link)

What books are you looking forward to reading?

❤️ Annette

1 year ago: Can’t-Wait Wednesday

14 of My Favorite Bookstagrammers

I sort of fail at keeping up with my Instagram, but that doesn’t stop me from following and liking photos posted by others! Below is a list of my favorite Bookstagrammers.

What is a bookstagram you ask? It’s an Instagram devoted to beautiful pictures of books. Eye candy for us bookworms. 🙂

Click on the link to be directed to their Instagram.

bookishly.tiff

bookswithdorothy

thefearlessreader

firstbooklove

from.thornfield.hall

intothepagesofficial

ofbooksandstarlight

paperbackbones

perpetualpages

readthewriteact

read.write.coffee

rearwindowreads

rissi006

scribnerbooks

Sorry it’s just links and not pictures – I don’t feel comfortable using their pictures without permission, and I’m too lazy to ask. 😛

You can find my bookstagram here, although I rarely update it. If you’ve got a bookstagram feel free to share the URL/link in the comments! I’d love to check them all out!

💗 Annette

bookstagram

1 Year AgoSix Great BookTubers!

10 Bookish Reasons My Mom is Awesome

Happy Mother’s Day to all you moms out there! Today I am outlining all the book-related ways my Mom is awesome. She’s awesome in many other ways, but since this is a book blog, you get book related things. 🙂 (A lot of these also apply to my Dad, but it’s not his day so…)

  1. She has recommended some great books to me.
    Did you know she’s the one who recommended Harry Potter to me? That alone should tell you how fantastic her book game is.
  2. She still recommends books for me to read.
    I wrote an entire post about it, which you can find here.
  3. She read books aloud to us when we were younger.
    The one I remember the most was The Trumpet of the Swan by E. B. White. She read it to us before we were old enough to read it ourselves, and it was a great book to read and think about as a family.
  4. She would read books while we read books, just so she could discuss them with us.
    She read the Harry Potter series side by side with me, so that we could discuss them once I finished.
  5. She taught us to be readers by being an example of a great reader.
    My mom still reads all the time, and she did the same when we were children. (If I remember correctly, we thought it was funny to try to distract her from reading, or to jump on her while she was reading, back when we were toddlers.)
  6. She would let us choose a book to purchase from Scholastic.
    There were usually two 99 cent books as part of the Scholastic book flyers. She often let us choose one of them to add to our collection. In kindergarten I got one about different kinds of apples (don’t remember the title though), and as I got older, this was how I added Santa Paws and The Dolphin Diaries to my collection.
  7. She took us to the library all the time.
    Even to this day, libraries are still a wonderful, magical place. When we were little we got to pick out picture books to take home. I’m fairly sure I pretty much always chose Mary Wore Her Red Dress. When we got older we got to participate in the library’s summer reading programs. She’d let us wander the kids area of the library on our own while she went to look for books for herself. We had an entire shelf at home dedicated to library books, since as a family we checked so much out and read so much. By the time I graduated I had my library card number memorized and I knew many of the librarians there.
  8. We grew up in a home filled with books.
    I can’t remember a time in my life when I didn’t have a bookshelf. We had a white cube-like one when we were younger, which was great for our large picture book collection. I had my own (!) night-stand size one when I was in elementary school, which was awesome – it gave me ownership for the care of my books. And while I don’t think we ever bought books new, we always seemed to be inheriting them or finding them for cheap. I was never in want of books growing up.
  9. She started a business selling books.
    If you’re not yet convinced that my mom is awesome, maybe this will convince you – she started her own business! Being the bookish family we are, it was natural for her to start a company selling books. My Dad left his job and joined her a couple years after she started it, and it’s still what they do to this day. (If you’re curious, links to their Amazon and eBay stores can be found here.)
  10. She worked hard to teach me how to read.
    I don’t remember much of the process of learning how to read. But I know my mom would sit with me on the couch almost everyday when I was in kindergarten, guiding me through a book. The one that I remember fulling reading myself was Richard Scarry’s Farmer Patrick Pig. Although there were plenty of other books in there, including Go Dog Go, Hop on Pop, and some book about a fat cat.

There you go! A short glimpse into why my Mom is awesome. In what bookish ways is your mom awesome? Let me know!

❤ Annette

awesome

Books Recommended by My Mother

Mother’s Day is one week away! In honor of that, here are some books recommended by my mother.

(Contains affiliate links)

Ice Limit by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child

When I told my mom I was going to write the post, her first reaction was “It better contain Ice Limit!” So here it is as first. 🙂 It is marked as a thriller or an adventure novel, and, although I haven’t read it, it is definitely on my TBR!

Extra Virginity by Tom Mueller

Although the title sounds scandalous, this book is actually about olive oil. Apparently it is quite fascinating, and it’s another one I plan on picking up.

Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea by Gary Kinder

have read this one and it was fascinating! It is about retrieving a sunken ship (the richest in the world, according to the book’s tagline), and all the different technological advances were required to make it happen. It’s a lot more interesting that I’m making it sound, I promise. 🙂

Beautiful Cruel Country by Eva Antonia Wilber-Cruce

My mom loves southwest history (which is great, considering we live there), and no doubt she enjoys this book for that reason.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

This book covers the story of the life (and continued presence) of Henrietta Lacks. While she died over 50 years ago, her cells are still around and have been essential in many modern medical advances.

Paradox of Choice by Barry Schwartz

This is another non-fiction that investigates the ramifications of having the ability to choose. Is it a good thing? How does it tie into freedom and our well-being?

All of the above (except the one’s I’ve read) are definitely on my TBR. Are you adding any of them to yours as well? What books would your mom recommend?

❤ Annette

mother

15+ Crochet Patterns Based on Children’s Books

I really enjoy crocheting, even if I don’t get around to it as much as I should. So today, in honor of Children’s Book Week, I have a collection of crochet patterns based on children’s books. One of my favorite toddler/child gifts is to give a book along with a crocheted plush that matches that book. As of me writing this post, all of the linked-to patterns are free! Yay!

Because I haven’t made most of these, there aren’t many pictures of the projects themselves. Click on each link to head to each site to check them out! The books each project is based on (or that I associated them with) is next to each link. Clicking on that will take you to Amazon via an affiliate link.

Thing 1 and Thing 2 Crochet Hats by Repeat Crafter Me

Cat In the Hat Pencil Topper by Paper, Needles, n Sweets

Green Eggs and Ham by NyanPon



Star Bellied Sneetch by CraftyIsCool



Hungry Caterpillar Plush by Britteny’s Boutique (I’ve made this one! Check out my post about it here.)

Ballerina Mouse by Heart and Sew

Lowly Worm Plush by Little Black Marker (I’ve made this one too! Check out my post about it here.)


Little Red Riding Hood Doll by My Backyard Monsters

Little Red Riding Hood Cape by Repeat Crafter Me

Eeyore Plush by Skestes


Where the Wild Things Are Monster by Amigurumi To Go



Crayon Blanket by Interweave

Crayon Box Kawaii Cuddler by 3 am Grace Designs

Monkey Plush by Chimu Hamada



Fancy Goldfish Plush by Kate Wood



Mouse and Cookie Plush by Chaleur Life



Clifford the Dog Kid’s Hat by Crafter Chick

 

 

Do you have any patterns to add to this list? Which one are you most excited to make?

Happy crafting! ❤ Annette

crochet kids books

Children’s Book Week

Children’s Book Week starts today! You can find all the official information here.

This week I will try to post about children’s books. We’ll see how well I do at that! 😛 For today, I wanted to kick off the week by providing you with links to all of the children’s book related posts I’ve already done. Click on each image to go to the post!

12 awesome picture books

My favorite childhood picture books.

never fade

Why it’s important to introduce books to children, even at a young age.

10 Books I Want My Future Children to Read

Books I want my future children to read, based mainly on how much I enjoyed the books as a child.

caterpillar

A couple years ago I crocheted a Hungry Caterpillar as a Christmas gift.

worm

I also crocheted a Lowly Worm. 🙂

Bookish christmas gift guides (1)

Items (that aren’t books) that still foster a love for reading.

Bookish christmas gift guides

Bookish gifts for elementary aged children.

Elementary Books

My favorite authors from my childhood.

Last but not least, my children’s chapter book reviews (only two so far). Click on the images to go to the review.

43 410

Happy reading!

❤ Annette

Books to Read for Spring

So I don’t have a ton of books to share today, but I wanted to give you some ideas of books that are perfect for spring! (Although in Arizona our seasons are “hot” and “hotter”, so “spring” doesn’t quite apply. :P)

(Links and images are affiliate links)

Wings Series by Aprilynne Pike

I picked up the second one in a Walmart bargain bin and I was hooked! I don’t know if reading the series out of order (2, 1, 3, 4) affected how much I love the series, but this series is tied with Julie Kagawa’s Iron Fey series for my favorite fairie novels. The fairies in these books each represent a season, so they’re not specifically “spring”, but when I think of fairies I think of gardens and flowers and that makes me think of spring. 🌷

   

The $64 Dollar Tomato by William Alexander

If you only ever read one book about gardening, this should be the one. It’s told in a style similar to that of Freakonomics – non-fiction through stories. You follow the author as he tries to have the perfect garden… which ends up being a lot harder than he had anticipated. It’s also written with humor, which hooked me. I read this when I was in junior high (per my mother’s reccommendation) and loved it. It also imparted some wisdom that I still think about today. They meant it to apply to gardening, but it can definitely be applied elsewhere. “When in doubt, do nothing. Either the problem will get so bad you know what to do, or it will resolve itself.” (Not an exact quote, just from my memory.) (Also, it’s not advocating for apathy or inaction. They just point out that sometimes it’s better to wait to make a clear decision.)

100 Flowers to Knit and Crochet by Leslie Stanfield

I mentioned this one in my post 5 Awesome Crochet Books and 5 More I Want to Read, but it’s definitely worth mentioning here as well. If you’re a knitter or crocheter and you want to decorate your home with lots of springy, floral touches, this book will help you out! So far I’ve only made four or five of the patterns, but they all turned out beautiful. 🙂

Sleeping Naked is Green by Vanessa Farquharson

The author decided to change one aspect of her life to be more “green”, every day for an entire year. This book follows her as she tries to do this, and pushes herself out of her comfort zone, to unplug her fridge, sell her car, join eco-groups, and much more. She also discusses a bit about after her experiment – what did she go back to, and what was it that it turned out she didn’t really miss?

What books remind you of spring? I’d love to hear about them. 🙂

❤ Annette

spring

Authors I Loved in Elementary School

For a large portion of my childhood I would find an author I loved, and then read every book they ever wrote. So a lot of these authors I have read a large majority of their books, except those that came out after elementary school. 🙂 Looking back I’m not sure if I would like all of their styles now, but I certainly enjoyed them when I was reading them.

I put the authors in alphabetical order (by last name), so I don’t have to try and put them in order from least favorite to most favorite. I’ve included pictures to four of my favorites from each author.

(Links and pictures are affiliate links)

Andrew Clements

If you haven’t read any of his books, you should, even if you’re an adult. They’re great! Frindle is probably his most famous, but The Report Card is my favorite. (The Janitor’s Boy comes in at a close second.)

   

Sharon Creech

Her books are quirky, and often told in uncommon formats. For example, Love That Dog is written in poems.
   

Roald Dahl

How can you make it through childhood without reading at least one of his books? They were so unique and fantastical. The only book of his I didn’t enjoy was his auto-biography. My favorites of his are The BFG and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.
   

Gordon Korman

His Dive series is the first series I remember eagerly anticipating the release of the next book. Each of his books were short, but detailed, and kept me on the edge of my seat. As a child I read his Everest, Dive, Island, and On the Run series. When I got older I read Son of the Mob, and now as an adult I’m trying to catch up on the other books of his that I missed.

   

Ann M. Martin

The Babysitter’s Little Sister series were the first chapter books I ever read. I know I read at least the first 100 in the series before I got too old for it. Then I just moved on to The Babysitter’s Club.

   
Donald Sobol

His Encyclopedia Brown series is another favorite of mine. They contain short little mysteries that you as the reader can solve. I swear I remember a non-Encyclopedia Brown book of his too, but I can’t for the life of me find it. 😦

What were your favorite authors in elementary school? I loved taking a trip down memory lane, and I’m very tempted to pick up more books by these authors.

❤ AnnetteElementary Books