Quiz: Sort Your Dog into a Hogwarts House

My friend came up with this idea and I thought it sounded like a lot of fun! Here’s a short quiz to sort your dog into a Hogwarts House. Keep track of how many As, Bs, Cs, and Ds they get. I’ve included photos of my dog, because I think she’s adorable. ❤

  1. You take your dog to the a brand new dog park. They:
    1. Bravely bounce into the park, introducing themselves to all the dogs.
    2. Stick right by your side, annoyed if another dog tries to approach you.
    3. Are mostly interested in the agility toys (hoops, jumps) set up.
    4. Quickly introduce themselves to the other humans present, figuring out how to get pets/scratches from each.

      IMG_7894
      Daisy at the dog park
  2. You place a treat under one of three upside-down cups. They:
    1. Wait for you to reveal where the treat is.
    2. Sniff until they’ve found the right cup, and push it over to receive the treat.
    3. Immediately go to the correct cup and treat, no sniffing required.
    4. Knock over all three cups to find the treat.
  3. A visitor comes over for the first time. Your dog:
    1. Runs happily up to the person, wagging their tail.
    2. Sticks by your side until you indicate that the visitor is okay.
    3. Does something new and unexpected each time you have a new visitor.
    4. Doesn’t let the person in until they have been thoroughly sniffed and approved of.
  4. It’s time for a treat! Your dog prefers:
    1. Pretty much anything you give them. They’re always up for something new!
    2. A simple puzzle toy, like a Kong filled with peanut butter
    3. A complex puzzle toy, where they have to solve a puzzle to get a treat dispensed (like a shuffle board or flip board)
    4. A chew, such as a bull stick or beef knuckle
      IMG_7391
  5. Does your dog have any nervous habits?
    1. Nope, they’re always confident.
    2. They yawn.
    3. They hide.
    4. They stick out their tongue or lick their nose.

      IMG_7899
      Guess what my dog’s nervous habit is?
  6. Does your dog bark a lot?
    1. Only if approached by an unfamiliar dog or person.
    2. All the time.
    3. Only if you ask them to “speak”.
    4. Yes, but only at a low volume.
  7. You take your dog to an obedience class. They:
    1. Grow bored after a while and start exploring the area.
    2. Keep trying until they get every command perfectly.
    3. Pick the commands up quicker than all the other dogs in the class.
    4. Figure out how to get to the treats without following a command.

      IMG_7897
      A perfect “sit”
  8. Would your dog make a good service dog?
    1. Maybe. They’re generally kind to everyone, but also love adventures.
    2. Absolutely! My dog would do anything for me.
    3. Sure – they’re a quick learner.
    4. Nope, there’s no way they wouldn’t get into trouble.
  9. You take your dog hiking. They:
    1. Run ahead to scout out the trail.
    2. Never get tired and stick by your side the whole time.
    3. Want to sniff everything.
    4. Stay close, but as the leader of your “pack”.

      IMG_7475
      Sniff
  10. You give your dog a new toy. They:
    1. Destroy it.
    2. Are obsessed with it and play with it for hours.
    3. Quickly grow bored with it.
    4. Would rather play with the packaging.
      IMG_7328

Results:

Mostly As: Gryffindor – your dog is courageous, brave, and chivalrous.
Mostly Bs: Hufflepuff – your dog is a hard worker, is patient, just, and loyal.
Mostly Cs: Ravenclaw – your dog is intelligent, creative, a quick learner, and witty.
Mostly Ds: Slytherin – your dog is ambitious, cunning, resourceful, and a good leader.

(House descriptions from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hogwarts.)

IMG_8040
Daisy the Gryffindor (and her summer haircut)

In case you’re wondering, that means my dog is a Gryffindor. (Although Ravenclaw was a close second.)

What house was your dog sorted into?

❤ Annette

dogwarts

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Book Review: Second-Hand Dog by Carol Lee Benjamin

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Summary

This book addresses the unique problems than may come along with a “second-hand” dog, whether you found them on the street or adopted them from a shelter.

What I Liked

  • This book was a light, quick read. It wasn’t overly detailed like some dog training books are.
  • This book was really positive. I read it when I was struggling a lot with my dog, so this came at a great time.
  • Instructions (if any) were simple and easy to understand. Plus, there were wonderful little illustrations throughout the book.
  • I love that this book is geared specifically for “second-hand” dogs, since a lot of advice I find is for people who raised their dogs from puppies. I got my dog when she was already two years old, so I can’t control her past. I can only control her future.

What I Didn’t Like

  • This book seems like it would be a great read for a child getting a new dog, but did not provide as many details or depth as I would have liked. It wasn’t overly helpful, but it was positive enough to give me the oomph to try harder training my dog.

In Conclusion

If you need a quick read to pull you out of being frustrated with your dog, this book is for you.

Find it on: Goodreads | Amazon (affiliate link)

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50 Literary Dog Name Ideas

Back in November I adopted my first dog ever. Before I finally settled on her name (Daisy), I had a lot to contemplate. I thought it would be fun to put together a list of ideas for literary dog names! Most I came up with on my own, but I also used this article for some ideas. 🙂 The series or book it comes from is in parentheses if it isn’t immediately obvious from the name.

FullSizeRender (3)
Because I can, here’s a picture of my dog. Aren’t her eyebrows wild?

From Novels

  1. Fluffy (from Harry Potter)
  2. Fang (from Harry Potter)
  3. Bumbersnoot (from Finishing School)
  4. Lassie
  5. Toto (from Wizard of Oz)
  6. Tock (from The Phantom Toll Booth)
  7. Shiloh
  8. Old Yeller
  9. Winn-Dixie
  10. Marley
  11. Achoo (from Beka Cooper)
  12. Tahoi (from Beka Cooper)

From Children’s Books

  1. Scooby Doo
  2. Spot
  3. Clifford
  4. Biscuit
  5. Poky
  6. Snoopy
  7. Santa Paws
  8. Harry (from Harry the Dirty Dog)
  9. Skippyjon Jones (he’s actually a cat, but he thinks he’s a dog…)
  10. Mudge (from Henry and Mudge)

Names of Other Creatures in Books

  1. Pookie Bear (from Penryn and the End of Days)
  2. Faithful (from Song of the Lioness)
  3. Anatole
  4. Charlotte (from Charlotte’s Web)
  5. Wilbur (from Charlotte’s Web)
  6. Stewart (from Stewart Little)
  7. Hedwig (from Harry Potter)
  8. Pete (from Pete the Cat)
  9. Pounce (from Beka Cooper)
  10. Nawat (from Daughter of the Lioness)
  11. Darkness (from Song of the Lioness)
  12. Spots (from Immortals)
  13. Frostfur (from Immortals)
  14. Ren (from Tiger Saga)
  15. Kishan (from Tiger Saga)

Other Literary Name Ideas

  1. Rogue (from Talon)
  2. Ember (from Talon)
  3. Tula (from Tin Star)
  4. Storm (from Elementals)
  5. Spirit (from Elementals)
  6. Secret (from Elementals)
  7. Lola (from Lola and the Boy Next Door)
  8. Cricket (from Lola and the Boy Next Door)
  9. Ruff… er… Raffe (from Penryn and the End of Days)
  10. Ash (from Iron Fey)
  11. Puck (from Midsummer Night’s Dream)
  12. Laurel (from Wings)
  13. Harry Pawter (or Harry Pupper) 😀

Bonus! Name from the TV Show Friends

(This isn’t related at all, but I thought it was fun. :D)

  1. Muttsarella
  2. LaPooh
  3. Chi Chi
  4. Clunkers
  5. Chappy

What literary dog names did I miss? What’s your favorite from this list?

❤ Annette

Dog Names

Book Review: Lucky Dog Lessons by Brandon McMillan

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Summary

Every week, Brandon McMillan takes a dog and trains them, working to get them suitable for a forever home. He’s trained thousands of dogs over the years, so he has many tricks and tips up his sleeve for training them successfully. He outlines how to prepare for training before going into how to train the seven basic commands: SIT, DOWN, STAY, HEEL, COME, OFF, and NO. He also takes time to explain how to address common dog “problems” such as barking, digging, door dashing, and housetraining, among others.

What I Liked

  • So I’ve only read two books on training dogs, but if you do have a new dog, I definitely recommend this one! His methods are surprisingly simple and seem to be working pretty well for me and my dog.
  • He acknowledges that training doesn’t go perfectly every time or for every dog. Which means he provides lots of ideas for the tough cases. It gives you a lot of different tools to use if you need them.
  • My friend used his technique to train her dogs not to door dash. After only a couple of hours they had broken the habit completely. She was pleased that his technique had worked so well where even a professional trainer had failed.
  • The techniques work for me, a brand-new dog owner, who never even had a dog growing up, and for my friend, who has had at least fifteen years of raising dogs.
  • Another friend of mine called it “the most passive-aggressive  way to dog train”, which actually sums up the book pretty well. Your dog likes chewing your shoes? Tie the shoe to his collar and let him wear it around for a while! After that your dog may not like your shoes very much. This is just one of many similar techniques the author introduces.

What I Didn’t Like

  • Now I actually have to take the time to train my dog? 😋

In Conclusion

If you’re planning on getting a dog, if you just got a dog, or if you’re a long time dog owner, this book is definitely worth picking up!

Find it on: Goodreads | Amazon (affiliate link)