Book Review: Scooby-Doo y el Monstruo de las Nieves (Scooby-Doo and the Snow Monster)

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

I read books in Spanish to improve my Spanish vocabulary. (I mean… it’s how I learned or reinforced a lot of my English vocabulary so….) As you can guess by the title of this book, I’m still at a child’s reading level in Spanish.

This book follows Scooby-Doo, Shaggy, and the rest of the “gang” as they go on vacation at a ski resort. Unfortunately, there is a snow monster terrorizing the guests of the resort! After it bothers the crew one too many times, they decide to figure out who is behind the monster.

This book gets four stars. It was a little bit less predictable than the usual Scooby-Doo story, but still followed the basic pattern. In an effort to not make the culprit super obvious, the author introduced quite a few characters. If I was reading in my native language this might not have been a problem, but it was confusing to me as it was, and I suspect it would be confusing to a beginning reader as well.

Spanish words I learned/reinforced with this book:

Albergue – Cabin
Escalera – Ladder
Cobertizo – Shed
Furgoneta – Van

 (affiliate link)

Advertisements

Ten Book Recommendations for Those in a Reading Slump

Today’s post is based on Top Ten Tuesday at Broke and Bookish. I have for you ten books that will help you break your reading slump. These are books that have gotten me out of my own slumps, or that I just couldn’t put down! (Post contains affiliate links.)

Ten Books for Those in a Reading Slump

1. Letters to the Lost by Brigid Kemmerer

This is, hands-down, the best book I’ve read this year. An actual review is coming soon, but this book will definitely take you out of a slump! I read it all in one sitting. It follows Juliet, a photographer, who has recently lost her mother. She writes letters to her mother and leaves them at her mother’s grave. Declan, a high school delinquent, finds one of the letters and responds. The following conversations and events create an amazing story.

 

2. Cinder and Ella by Kelly Oram

 

This book is just plain adorable. It’s a pretty easy read and every time I even go to re-read a passage, I get sucked in and read basically the whole thing. The main character, Ella, is recovering from severe burns received due to a car accident. She has to deal with her father, stepmother, and stepsisters for the first time in her life, and it’s challenging. Her only solace is in her online blog and online pen-pal, Cinder.


3. What If by Randall Munroe
This is a super fun science book that takes crazy questions (“What would happen if you drained the ocean and put the water on Mars?”) and answers them with science. The author is as the creator of the web comic XKCD, and he once worked for NASA.

4. Talon by Julie Kagawa

 

Give this book two chapters, and you’ll be hooked. The female main character is a dragon in human form, assigned to learn how to assimilate with humans. The male main character is a dragon-slayer – a soldier who has been taught to kill first, ask questions never.

5. The Martian by Andy Weir

This may only pick you out of a slump if you are a logical-mathematical type person. I loved this story about a man who is accidentally left behind on Mars and must learn to survive with minimal supplies until he can be rescued. He has to face many obstacles you would never thing of on earth, and the stakes for everything are life or death.


6. Bad Connection by Melody Carlson

This is a Christian fiction novel that follows Samantha McGregor – a teen who gets visions. When she gets one of a person who has gone missing, she knows she needs to step in and help with the investigation. This is an intriguing mystery/crime novel.

7. Angelfall by Susan Ee

While I did only give this book three stars, it also kept me hooked from beginning to end. And then I did the same thing with the next book. And then the next. As a series, the books will keep you on edge, intrigued about the next action. The series follows Penryn as she navigates post-apocalyptic Earth, which has now been invaded by angels.

8. Crash by Lisa McMann

This is a super quick but intense read. It follows Jules – your average Italian high schooler, who works at her parent’s pizza shop, argues with her two siblings, and avoids her family’s rivals. Then she starts seeing a vision. There’s a crash, and then, lots of body bags. What does it mean? And what can she do about it?

9. Jessica’s Guide to Dating on the Dark Side by Beth Fantaskey

 

This book is great for fans of Twilight. Jessica’s life has been pretty normal so far. And then an exchange student/vampire shows up and turns her life upside down.

10. Lola and the Boy Next Door by Stephanie Perkins

This is an adorable young adult romance, and it’s my favorite in the Anna and the French Kiss series. (Lola… is second in the series, but it can easily be read out of order.) Lola is an eccentric designer with a passion for costumes, and Cricket is an inventor who lives next door, and who hasn’t been in Lola’s life for years. (It’s a romance, so I’m sure you can guess the rest. 🙂)

So that’s it! What books would you recommend to someone in a reading slump? Have you read any of the books above? Let me know!

❤️ Annette

My Favorite Childhood Picture Books

Today I’m going to share with you some of my favorite books from my childhood. Both of my parents were huge influences on my love of reading. My dad read to me and my siblings all the time in the evenings, a mother is a huge reader herself. She read chapter books aloud to us, or read them at the same time as us, so we could discuss them. The books below are all picture books that I remember being read to me over and over and over again, as I’d often request them.  Hopefully this will help you remember some of the wonderful books from your past as well! (Post contains affiliate links.)

Chicka-Chicka-Boom-Boom by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambaut

This is one of the first books I think of when I think of picture books from my childhood. All the nonsensical words and the wonderful rhythm makes this book a wonderful read, for any age really. 🙂

Harvest Mice by Beverly Randall

 

This one is adorable, and maybe set off an obsession of mine with all things mouse related. (I’ve got a collection of adorable mice – not real, of course.) There is a sad page about harvest mice getting eaten though, so if you’re reading this to a child, maybe tear that page out first?

 

 

Farmer Patrick Pig by Richard Scarry

This is the first book I remember reading all the way through by myself. Of course I’d heard the story before, but it was still a magical moment. I read the book to my mom, making only a few mistakes, and my five year old self decided to cement the book in her head as the first she ever read. (All of Richard Scarry’s books are awesome. I mean, Lowly Worm? A pickle car? They’re all awesome and inventive.)

Little Critter These Are My Pets by Mercer Mayer
I loved all Little Critter books (we owned most of them), but I think this one was my favorite. He has a spider and a dog and a frog and they were all so fun to point out on the page as a child.

A Fish Out of Water by Helen Palmer and P.D. Eastman

This story is about Otto the fish, who got fed to much and kept growing and growing and growing. He outgrows his fishbowl and then the bathtub… and so on.

Disney Babies

I don’t remember which book specifically it was that I read over and over again, but it was definitely one in this series.

But No Elephants by Jerry Smath

This is a wonderful book about a woman who takes all sorts of animals in… but won’t take elephants.

Dinner at the Panda Palace by Stephanie Calmenson

This one’s good for those who are learning to count! It was even recommended in my teaching math class in college. In this book a panda works to seat and feed groups of animals in his restaurant.

Dragon in a Wagon by Jane Moncure

This book is about a dragon in a wagon… need I say more? This is one my parents lament reading to me repeatedly. 🙂

Mary Wore Her Red Dress by Merle Peek

I’m fairly sure this was perpetually checked out (by me) at our local library. It’s got colors and a catchy rhyme. What’s not to love?

Go Dog Go by P. D. Eastman

I love this book too! Where are the dogs going? They’re all on their way to an important destination, and with such fun colors and shapes and sizes too!

Alexander and the Wind Up Mouse by Leo Lionni

This one is a-dor-a-ble. It’s about a mouse who meets a wind-up mouse and works to make the wind-up-mouse real, so they can be friends.

What are your favorite books from your childhood?

❤️ Annette

12 awesome picture books

Book Review: Sixteen Kisses by Kelly Oram

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

This novella follows Cassie on the day of her sixteenth birthday. Up until this day, she’s never been kissed. Will that change now that she’s sixteen?

This book was cute. It’s perfect for reading in a waiting room, or even a quick trip to the beach. It is a little predictable, and it doesn’t have the depth of a normal novel, but for a novella I thought it was great.

(affiliate link)

YouTube Video Related to “So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed”

(Post contains affiliate links)

So after reading and writing a review on So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson, I recalled a YouTube video I watched a while back. The video is by one of my favorite YouTube channels, SciShow. In it, they discuss the different psychological reasons for internet trolling. So if you were intrigued by Jon Ronson’s book and want to learn more, this is a great video to watch. And if you just like awesome YouTube videos, you’ll probably like it too. 😊

New on the Stack in July 2017

I’m linking up to The Deliberate Reader for this post. Here are the books I got, in some way or another, during the month of July. Next to each I try to explain why I chose to purchase/borrow that particular book. (Clicking on the picture of each book will take you to the book’s Amazon page, through an affiliate link.)

Borrowed from Friends

Plot Perfect by Paula Munier

This book was recommended to me by my writer friend.

 

 


Wired for Story by Lisa Cron

Another book recommended to my by my writer friend.

 

Quiet! by Susan Cain

I’ve wanted to read this book for a while now so when I saw it at a friends house I had to borrow it!

 

Purchased eBook

Talon by Julie Kagawa

I loved Julie Kagawa’s Iron Fey series, so I was super excited to pick up her series about dragons.

 


Rogue by Julie Kagawa

After reading Talon, I had to immediately go and buy the sequel!

 

 

Re Designed by Denise Swank

I’m trying to finish series that I’ve started, so this is book two in the Off the Subject series.

 

Baby Comes First by Beverly Farr

I enjoyed Beverly Farr’s Love and Chocolate series so I picked up a couple of ebooks by her.

 


Forgotten Honeymoon by Beverly Farr

Another book by Beverly Farr.

 

MacFarland’s Lass by Glynnis Campbell

Another series I’m trying to finish.

 

 

Borrowed eBook Through Kindle Unlimited

Taken by Tuesday by Catherine Bybee

I’ve enjoyed the first four books so far, so here’s the fifth.

 

Wide Awake by Shelly Crane

I really like her Significance series, so I figured I’d give this one a shot.

 

Accidentally Hers by Jamie Beck

I read a couple of books by this author a couple of years ago, and enjoyed them.

 


Worth the Trouble by Jamie Beck

Another series I’m trying to finish.

 

 


It Had to Be Love by Tamra Baumann

Another series I’m trying to finish. (See a pattern here?)

 

Chameleon by Kelly Oram

I love everything by Kelly Oram, so I’m excited to read more of her work!

 

 


Serial Hottie by Kelly Oram

Another book by Kelly Oram. 🙂

 

Being Jamie Baker by Kelly Oram

Another book by Kelly Oram.

 

V is for Virgin  by Kelly Oram

Yet another book by Kelly Oram.

 

Undeniably Chosen by Shelly Crane

Book five in the Significance series.

 

 

What books did you pick up in July?

❤️ Annette

Book Review: So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

(post contains affiliate links)

In this non-fiction book, Jon Ronson delves into the world of public shaming. Although he does investigate the roots of public shaming all the way back to the days of stocks and whippings, most of the stories and interviews shared in this book are about a newer, modern day version of shaming – internet shaming. He shares the stories of people whose lives have been turned upside down based on one poorly placed comment or photo on the internet. He also speaks to those who do the shaming, and tries to make sense of the entire situation.

If you’re a fan of narrative style non-fiction books such as Freakonomics, you’ll probably enjoy this one as well. Because it deals with a real-world problem, the ending is not as neat-and-tidy as I would have liked. The information within the book, however, is fascinating, and it makes me question any action I have ever taken on the internet. Both from the perspective of “how could someone use this to destroy me?” and “could this comment/action be affecting someone else in a negative way?”

If you want to get a large glimpse into this book, or if you just want to watch a short overview instead of reading the entire thing, you can view Jon Ronson’s TEDTalk here.